Putnam County Hospital offering drive up flu shots

Flu season is just around the corner.  Putnam County Hospital would like to announce that they will be offering a drive thru flu clinic at Putnam Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Family Medicine of Cloverdale, and North Putnam Family Healthcare.  The clinics will be held on October 3, October 9 and October 24 for anyone wishing to receive the flu shot.  On September 19, these locations will be offering the high dose flu vaccination for those that are immune compromised and senior citizens.  These vaccinations are by appointment only.  The schedule your appointment please call Putnam Pediatrics and Internal Medicine at 765.301.7400, Family Medicine of Cloverdale at 765.795.4242, or North Putnam Family Healthcare at 765.301.7679.

 

What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two.

Both COVID-19 and flu can spread from person-to-person, between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). Both are spread mainly by droplets made when people with the illness (COVID-19 or flu) cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. It may be possible that a person can get infected by physical human contact (e.g. shaking hands) or by touching a surface or object that has virus on it and then touching his or her own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. Both flu virus and the virus that causes COVID-19 may be spread to others by people before they begin showing symptoms, with very mild symptoms or who never developed symptoms (asymptomatic).

While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it.

 

Both COVID-19 and flu can have varying degrees of signs and symptoms, ranging from no symptoms (asymptomatic) to severe symptoms. Common symptoms that COVID-19 and flu share include:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle pain or body aches
  • Headache
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults

·      SOME Differences

 

  • Signs and symptoms of COVID-19, different from flu, may include change in or loss of taste or smell.
  • If a person has COVID-19, it could take them longer to develop symptoms than if they had flu.
  • Typically, a person develops symptoms anywhere from 1 to 4 days after infection.
  • Typically, a person develops symptoms 5 days after being infected, but symptoms can appear as early as 2 days after infectionor as late as 14 days after infection, and the time range can vary.
  • If a person has COVID-19, they may be contagious for a longer period of time than if they had flu.
  • Most people with flu are contagious for about 1 day before they show symptoms.
  • Older children and adults with flu appear to be most contagious during the initial 3-4 days of their illness but many remain contagious for about 7 days.
  • Infants and people with weakened immune systems can be contagious for even longer.
  • How long someone can spread the virus that causes COVID-19 is still under investigation.
  • It’s possible for people to spread the virus for about 2 days before experiencing signs or symptoms and remain contagious for at least 10 days after signs or symptoms first appeared. If someone is asymptomatic or their symptoms go away, it’s possible to remain contagious for at least 10 days after testing positive for COVID-19.
  • There are multiple FDA-licensed influenza vaccinesproduced annually to protect against the 3 or 4 flu viruses that scientists anticipate will circulate each year.
  • Currently there is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. Vaccine developers and other researchers and manufacturers are expediting the development of a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

 

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